Having watched Carol Klein visit the Millennium Garden at Pensthorpe Nature Reserve (BBC Gardeners World Episode 21), we’ve now added one more garden to our wishlist of gardens to see.

Here are six more of our favourite gardens to visit that are of significance to landscape and garden design. 

1. Hidcote Manor Gardens, Gloucestershire

Hidcote Manor with it’s structure of garden ‘rooms’ separated by walls and hedges is an inspirational garden to visit at any time of the year.  A garden that has its origins in the Arts and Crafts movement has a reputation as one of the most influential gardens of the 20th century.

Design significance: Arts & Crafts. Garden of rooms. www.nationaltrust.org.uk/hidcote/

2. Rousham Manor, Oxfordshire

Rousham and its landscape garden represent the first phase of English landscape design. The 18th-century landscape retains many of its original features and is one of the few gardens of this date to have escaped alteration.

Design significance: William Kent. Augustan landscape garden. www.rousham.org

3. Sissinghurst Castle & Gardens, Kent

Sissinghurst is one of the worlds most celebrated gardens and is the creation of Vita Sackville-West and her husband Sir Harold Nicholson. Sissinghurst garden is a prime example of the Arts and Crafts style. Noted for its classic design of garden rooms, vistas, and iconic ‘White Garden’, Sissinghurst has enduring appeal and remains inspirational.

Design significance: Vita Sackville-West. Arts & Crafts. Garden of rooms. www.nationaltrust.org.uk/sissinghurst/

4. Chatsworth, Derbyshire

Set in the heart of the Peak District in Derbyshire Chatsworth is one of Britain’s most famous historic houses and its 105 acre garden was designed by Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown. Chatsworth is famed for its waterworks and fountains that include the 300 year old Grand Cascade and enormous Emperor fountain. There’s also extensive woodland, cottage and kitchen gardens, the maze and magnificent rare trees.

Design significance: Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown. English landscape garden. www.chatsworth.org

5. Great Dixter, East Sussex

Great Dixter is celebrated for the exuberant and imaginative planting and plant combinations of Christopher Lloyd. Most of the original design was by Lutyens and the garden was later planted with great flair by Christopher Lloyd. It’s famous for the Long Border and the sub-tropical plants that form a riot of late-summer colour in the Exotic Garden.

Design significance: Christopher Lloyd. Arts & Crafts. www.greatdixter.co.uk

6. Stourhead, Wiltshire

Stourhead is described by the National Trust as one of the finest landscape gardens in the world. Stourhead was at the forefront of the 18th-century English landscape movement. The temples, bridges and trees reflected in the still waters of the lake combine to create memorable scenes and ever-changing vistas.

Design significance: Henry Hoare II. English landscape garden. www.nationaltrust.org.uk/stourhead

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