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The garden at Gravetye Manor is famous for being created by William Robinson. Robinson is known for pioneering the naturalistic style of gardening. In 1884 Robinson moved to Gravetye where he spent the next 50 years putting his ideas into practice.

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Views of the flower garden and Manor house.

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Foxgloves and Persicaria bistorta.

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Lupins, Alliums and Aquilegias.

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The exuberant borders spill over the paved paths that surround the main flower garden.

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Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus), amongst annuals and perennials.

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A mass of Wisteria growing over a pergola.

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Alliums amongst Nepeta, with Wisteria in the background.

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A dry border, featuring Nepeta and Sisyrinchium striatum.

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Taking the path through the Azalea bank.

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Astrantia major.

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Inside the walled Kitchen garden. Foxtail lilies in the foreground.

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The path out from the Kitchen garden.

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Further information: http://www.gravetyemanor.co.uk

Photo credits: Garden Design Eye

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In the second of our two posts about Bury Court, we look at the garden designed by Christopher Bradley-Hole.

The front garden was a later addition to Bury Court and provides a contrast to the courtyard garden. This garden is designed around a formal grid pattern of rusted steel-edged beds and gravel paths and the garden is planted with swathes of tall grasses mixed with carefully selected flowering perennials to create a dream-like meadow feel.* A contemporary reflective pool and seating area are at its heart.

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The linear design of the seating area ties in with the grid pattern of the garden layout. The spaces between the wooden uprights provide framed vistas of the surrounding garden.

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The arching stems and golden flowerheads of the grass Stipa gigantea stand out amongst the greenery of the surrounding foliage.

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Hakonechloa macra ‘Alboaurea’ cascades over the side of the corten steel edging.

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The dark pool reflects the sky and the foliage of the grasses that run alongside.

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The masses of rich red bottle brush-like flowers of Sanguisorba officinalis form a silhouette  against the sky.

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One of the paths that intersect the garden flanked either side by deep borders filled with different grasses and perennials.

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A mass planting of Calamagrostis x acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’. The upright stems and form of the grass echo the vertical wooden panels of the building.

Further information:

Bury Court – http://www.burycourtbarn.com

Christopher Bradley-Hole – http://www.christopherbradley-hole.co.uk

*Source – http://www.burycourtbarn.com

Photo Credits: Garden Design Eye

Bury Court in Surrey showcases the work of two leading designers; Piet Oudolf and Christopher Bradley-Hole. Garden Design Eye were excited to get the opportunity to visit Bury Court where both of these designers have created gardens.

In the first of two blog posts we take a look at the walled garden at Bury Court designed by Piet Oudolf.

The contemporary walled garden is a well-known garden recognised for its grasses and hardy perennials. Planted in 1997, the walled garden was the first naturalistic garden designed by Piet Oudolf in Britain*. The planting in the garden is a mixture of the ornamental grasses and perennials that are his signature.

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A cobbled stone pathway works its way around the garden and past luxuriantly planted borders and sculpted box and yew hedges.

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As the visitor follows the path around the garden, different vistas of the garden and its areas of planting are presented, such as the stylised meadow in the background of the photos above and below.

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The meadow planting uses Molinia grasses and is interspersed with red clover “Trifolium rubens” and foxgloves, plus other perennials.

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A closer view of the meadow planting, here the emerging stems of Allium sphaerocephalon mingle with the flower heads of the red clover.

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The deep borders on the eastern side of the garden are filled with taller plants at the back of the border, such as the spires of the veronicastrum, and shorter plants at the front of the border, such as sedum and salvia.

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The mass of plants jostle for space and spill over on to the path. Geranium, salvia and agastache are used repeatedly in the garden.

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Stipa gigantea grasses add their stature, elegance and height to the borders.

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Inspiring planting combinations can be seen throughout the garden.

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Contrasting foliage forms and textures; Rodgersia, digitalis and gaura.

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Eryngium, anthemis and stipa tenuissima in combination.

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Eryngium and phlomis paired together.

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Plants with spires and strong vertical accents are much in evidence.

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Topiary is used here to create a lattice effect.

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Broad leaved bog and marginal plants fringe the pond.

*source: http://www.burycourtbarn.com

For more information:

Bury Court: http://www.burycourtbarn.com/gardens

Piet Oufolf: http://www.oudolf.com

Photo credits: Garden Design Eye

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